Multi channel Test Automation with open source



http://www.techgig.com/expert-speak/Multi-channel-Test-Automation-with-open-source-557

As of now, there exists no tool, open source or otherwise, to facilitate automation of test cases which run across platforms. For e.g. selenium is great to handle across browser testing; but has no support when a need to do image based testing; web service testing or mobile application testing, arises. Currently there is no framework available where one can make use of more than one automation tool in the same test case.
For example, in case of an enterprise application an end to end test case/business process may trace from UI layer to API/web services to Database and finally to Mobile App. To automate this test case, UI layer validations can be done using Selenium, API/Web services validation can be done using SOAPUI, Database validation can be done using SQL script and Mobile App validation can be achieved using Robotium. This way, we can utilize best of breed tools where ever they fit best while providing a tool abstraction for the end user.

The objective of the talk would be to present a solution (a test automation framework) with which one can use a fusion of test automation tools, leveraging the capabilities of the individual tool/tools to achieve a state of complete test automation and at the same time reducing the overall test automation effort required.

source

5 Open Source Home Automation Tools

The Internet of Things isn’t only a buzzword, it’s a speedily increasing reality.

With an ever-expanding number of devices accessible to help you automate, protect, and monitor your home, it has no time before been easier nor more tempting to have a go at home automation. Whether you’re aiming to regulate your HVAC(Heating Ventilating Air Conditioning) system remotely, integrate a home entertainment, safeguard your home from fraud, fire, or other dangers, reduce your energy usage, or only control some lights, there are lots of devices available at your fingertips.

While connected devices typically contain exclusive components, a good initial step in bringing open source into your home automation system is to make sure that the device which ties your devices together-and presents you with an user interface to them (the “hub”)-is open source. Fortuitously, you’ll find so many choices available, with options to run on everything from your always-on PC to a Raspberry Pi.

Take a look at a few of our preferred.

Calaos

Calaos is designed as a full-stack home automation platform, with a server application, touchscreen interface, web application, native mobile applications for android and ios, and a preconfigured Linux OS to run underneath. English speaking readers should be advised that, while some English documentation can be obtained, part of the instructional material and even support discussion forums are generally in French.

Calaos is licensed under version 3 of the GPL and you can view its source code on GitHub. https://github.com/calaos

Domoticz

Domoticz is a home automation system with a pretty wide collection of supported devices, which range from weather stations to smoke detectors to remote controls, with a countless number of extra 3rd party integrations documented on the project’s web site. It is designed with an HTML5 frontend, rendering it reachable from both desktop computer web browsers together with most modern cell phones, and is featherweight, running on lots of low power items just like the Raspberry Pi.

Domoticz is written largely in C/C++ under the GPLv3, and its source code could be browsed on GitHub. https://github.com/domoticz/domoticz

Home Assistant

Home Assistant is an free home automation platform, and is designed to be conveniently deployed on essentially any machine that can run Python 3, from a Raspberry Pi to a NAS system, and as well ships with a Docker container to make implementing on other systems a cinch. It brings together with a number of free as well as business oriented offerings, making it possible to link, for instance, IFTTT, weather information, or maybe your Amazon Echo device, to regulates from locks to lights to even a command line notifier.

Home Assistant is released under an MIT license, and its source code is available from GitHub. https://github.com/balloob/home-assistant

OpenHAB

OpenHAB (stand for Open Home Automation Bus) is on the list of most famous home automation tools among open source enthusiasts, with a sizeable user community and a good number of supported devices and integrations. Written in Java, openHAB is easily transportable across the majority of major platforms and even runs correctly on the Raspberry Pi. Supporting 100s of devices, openHAB is designed to be device-agnostic while making it easier for developers to add in their own devices or plugins to the system. OpenHAB also ships android and ios apps for device control, together with a design tools which enables you to create your own User interface for your home system.

You can find openHAB’s source code on GitHub licensed under the Eclipse Public License. https://github.com/openhab/openhab

OpenMotics

OpenMotics is a home automation system with both software and hardware under open source licenses, designed at providing an all-inclusive system for controlling devices rather than stitching together a lot of devices from different providers. Unlike lots of the other systems designed largely for easy retrofitting, OpenMotics focuses on a hard wired solution. For extra, see our full article from OpenMotics backend developer Frederick Ryckbosch.

The source code for OpenMotics is licensed under the GPLv2 and is offered for download on GitHub. https://github.com/openmotics

These are not the only options available, naturally. A great many home automation lovers choose a diverse solution, or maybe attempt to roll their unique. Various other potential choices to look into involve LinuxMCE, PiDome, MisterHouse or smarthomatic. Other users opt for individual smart home devices without adding them into a single complete system.

Setting Up The Home Automation Server (OpenHAB 2 + MQTT): Demo 2017



In this video I will show you The Smart Home, Home Automation Server in action which runs OpenHAB 2 and Mosquito MQTT Server all on a raspberry pi 3. I will also explain the whole process of how this Home Automation Server works and what we will achieve by creating it.
Order the Kits, PCBs or 3D Printed Parts to make the devices here: https://www.mksmarthouse.com/shop

Link To Home Automation Server Guide: http://www.mksmarthouse.com/setup-instalation

Home Automation Server Videos:
Demo – https://youtu.be/bbWDnT-QMTI
Hardware – https://youtu.be/rxCFN4l6gYg
Software (Using Mac) – https://youtu.be/-uVmblps3kg
Software (Using Windows) – https://youtu.be/7YR0xwyBJ2E
Final Installation – https://youtu.be/cxP6rKpVpbk

Product Links:

Raspberry Pi Stuff
Raspberry Pi 3: http://amzn.to/2m62Kg6
Heatsink: http://s.click.aliexpress.com/e/IEYjeMf
Case With Fan: http://s.click.aliexpress.com/e/aUBAeEi
Power Adapter: http://amzn.to/2lIyh5E
Micro SD Card: http://amzn.to/2mQZGo7
Ethernet Cables: http://amzn.to/2mQVsws

Wall Mount Hardware
Plastic Spacers: http://s.click.aliexpress.com/e/2nUbA2j
Screws (M3.5 + 20mm): http://s.click.aliexpress.com/e/jMfIEea

Tools
Micro SD Card Reader: http://amzn.to/2lqsvL1
Impact Gun + Drill: http://amzn.to/2lqke9L
Screw Bit Set: http://amzn.to/2mQSpoh
Drill Bit Set: http://s.click.aliexpress.com/e/EyJMByR
Counter Sink Bit Set: http://s.click.aliexpress.com/e/vfYNNRb

Check out the official website: http://www.mksmarthouse.com

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/mksmarthouse
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MK-SmartHouse-244455842554740/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mksmarthouse

This channel will show you the path to creating your very own Ultimate Smart House using Arduino, raspberry pi, esp8266, OpenHAB 2 and more to do home automation. Each video will be a different project and tutorial that you can follow to make your house more technologically advanced. Also, there is more information as well as detailed guides on mksmarthouse.com

source

5 Open Home Automation Systems

The Internet of Things is not only a buzzword, it’s a extremely fast extending reality.

With an ever-increasing variety of devices open to help you automate, protect, and monitor your house, it has no time before been easier nor more tempting to have a go at home automation. Whether you’re attempting to handle your HVAC(Heating Ventilating Air Conditioning) system from another location, integrate a home entertainment system, defend your home from fraud, fire, or other risks, lower your energy usage, or perhaps control some lights, there are so many devices offered at your fingertips.

While connected devices typically contain private components, a good starting point in bringing open source into your home automation system is to ensure the device which ties your devices together-and presents you with an user interface to them (the “hub”)-is open source. Fortuitously, there are numerous options around the world, with alternatives to run on everything from your always-on computer to a Raspberry Pi.

Listed below are several of our most favorite.

Calaos

Calaos is designed as a full-stack home automation platform, with a server application, touchscreen interface, web application, native mobile apps for iOS and Android, and a preconfigured Linux OS to run underneath. English speaking readers should be advised that, while some English documentation is accessible, some of the instructional material and support forums are principally in French.

Calaos is licensed under version 3 of the GPL and you can view its source code on GitHub. https://github.com/calaos

Domoticz

Domoticz is a home automation system with a pretty wide library of supported devices, including weather stations to smoke detectors to remote controls, with a great number of extra third party integrations documented on the project’s web page. It is designed with an HTML5 frontend, making it reachable from both PC internet browsers and even most modern mobile phones, and is light in weight, running on numerous low power products similar to the Raspberry Pi.

Domoticz is written largely in C/C++ under the GPLv3, and its source code can be located on GitHub. https://github.com/domoticz/domoticz

Home Assistant

Home Assistant is an free home automation platform, and is designed to be effortlessly deployed on almost any machine that can run Python 3, from a Raspberry Pi to a NAS system, and even ships with a Docker container to make implementing on other systems a pleasant task. It brings together with a good number of free as well as business oriented offerings, which enables you to link, as an example, IFTTT, weather information, or your Amazon Echo device, to regulates from locks to lights to even a command line notifier.

Home Assistant is released under an MIT license, and its source code can be downloaded from GitHub. https://github.com/balloob/home-assistant

OpenHAB

OpenHAB (represent Open Home Automation Bus) is one of many most commonly known home automation tools amongst open source lovers, with a sizeable user community and a good number of supported devices and integrations. Written in Java, openHAB is light and portable across almost all major OS’s and even runs well on the Raspberry Pi. Supporting many devices, openHAB is designed to be device-agnostic while making it simpler for developers to include their own devices or plugins to the system. OpenHAB also ships iOS and Android apps for device control, as well as a design tools to help you to make your own User interface for your home system.

You will discover openHAB’s source code on GitHub licensed under the Eclipse Public License. https://github.com/openhab/openhab

OpenMotics

OpenMotics is a home automation system with both software and hardware under open source licenses, designed at providing an all-inclusive system for handling devices in place of sewing together several devices from diverse providers. Unlike a lot of the other systems designed largely for simple retrofitting, OpenMotics targets a hardwired solution. To get more, see our full article from OpenMotics backend developer Frederick Ryckbosch.

The source code for OpenMotics is licensed under the GPLv2 and is for download on GitHub. https://github.com/openmotics

These are not the only available choices, undoubtedly. Many home automation lovers decide on a diverse solution, or possibly tend to roll their particular. Many other potential options to check out include LinuxMCE, PiDome, MisterHouse or smarthomatic. Other people decide on private smart home devices without integrating them into a single well-rounded system.

Installing Jenkins 1.647- Open Source Automation Server on Ubuntu 15.04



In this Video Step by Step Demonstration is being done on Deployment of Jenkins- Open Source Automation Server on Ubuntu 15.04

Official Website of Jenkins

https://jenkins-ci.org/

Steps for Installing Jenkins can be found on my Facebook Page:

www.facebook.com/expertresearcher

source

5 Open House Automation Solutions

The Internet of Things isn’t just a buzzword, it’s a speedily increasing fact.

With an ever-rising quantity of devices available to help you automate, protect, and monitor your own home, it has never before been easier nor more tempting to have a go at home automation. Whether you’re looking to control your HVAC(Heating Ventilating Air Conditioning) system from another location, add in a home entertainment system, defend your home from theft, fire, or other risks, decrease your energy consumption, or maybe control some lights, there are numerous devices on offer at your disposal.

While connected devices frequently contain exclusive components, a good initial step in bringing open source into your home automation system is to make sure that the device which ties your devices together-and presents you with an interface to them (the “hub”)-is open source. The good news is, you’ll find so many solutions around, with options to run on everything from your always-on personal computer to a Raspberry Pi.

Have a look at several of our faves.

Calaos

Calaos is designed as a full-stack home automation platform, together with a server application, touchscreen interface, web application, native mobile apps for iOS and Android, and a preconfigured Linux operating platform to run underneath. English speaking readers should be advised that, while some English documentation can be obtained, a few of the instructional material plus support forums are principally in French.

Calaos is licensed under version 3 of the GPL and you can view its source code on GitHub. https://github.com/calaos

Domoticz

Domoticz is a home automation system with a quite wide library of supported devices, including weather stations to smoke detectors to remote controls, with a countless number of added alternative party integrations documented on the project’s website. It is designed with an HTML5 frontend, which makes it reachable from both desktop web browsers and most recent mobile phones, and is light in weight, running on a lot of low power products including the Raspberry Pi.

Domoticz is written largely in C/C++ under the GPLv3, and its source code can be browsed on GitHub. https://github.com/domoticz/domoticz

Home Assistant

Home Assistant is an free home automation platform, and is designed to be easily deployed on virtually any machine which could run Python 3, from a Raspberry Pi to a NAS device, and additionally comes with a Docker container to make implementing on other systems a simple process. It combines with a number of free and business oriented products, making it possible to link, as an illustration, IFTTT, weather information, or maybe your Amazon Echo device, to regulates from locks to lights to even a command line notifier.

Home Assistant is released under an MIT license, and its source code is available from GitHub. https://github.com/balloob/home-assistant

OpenHAB

OpenHAB (short for Open Home Automation Bus) is among the most famous home automation tools among open source enthusiasts, with a huge user community and numerous supported devices and integrations. Written in Java, openHAB is light and portable across most major operating systems and even runs properly on the Raspberry Pi. Supporting 100s of devices, openHAB is designed to be device-agnostic while making it simpler for developers to incorporate their own devices or plugins to the system. OpenHAB also ships iOS and Android apps for device control, as well as a design tools so you can design your own UI for your home system.

You can locate openHAB’s source code on GitHub licensed under the Eclipse Public License. https://github.com/openhab/openhab

OpenMotics

OpenMotics is a home automation system with both hardware and software under open source licenses, designed at providing a thorough system for handling devices in place of stitching together a good number of devices from different providers. In contrast to many of the other systems designed largely for easy retrofitting, OpenMotics is targeted on a traditional hardwired solution. For further, see our full article from OpenMotics backend developer Frederick Ryckbosch.

The source code for OpenMotics is licensed under the GPLv2 and is readily available for download on GitHub. https://github.com/openmotics

These are not the only available choices, of course. Loads of home automation aficionados opt for a various solution, or perhaps commit to roll their very own. A few other potential options to take into account include LinuxMCE, PiDome, MisterHouse or smarthomatic. Other folks decide on unique smart home devices without including them into a single comprehensive system.

Smart Home Automation with Linux and Raspberry Pi | Ebook



Get your free audio book: http://tpon.us/k/b00drefsqw Smart Home Automation with Linux and Raspberry Pi shows you how to automate your lights, curtains, …

source

5 Open Source House Automation Solutions

The Internet of Things isn’t necessarily a buzzword, it’s a fast increasing reality.

With an ever-increasing variety of devices offered to help you automate, protect, and monitor your property, it has no time before been simpler nor more tempting to try your hand at home automation. Whether you’re seeking to manage your HVAC(Heating Ventilating Air Conditioning) system remotely, add in a home entertainment system, shield your home from robbery, fire, or other risks, decrease your energy consumption, or simply just control some lights, there are many devices on offer at your convenience.

While connected devices usually contain personal components, a good starting point in bringing open source into your home automation system is to make certain the device which ties your devices together-and presents you with an user interface to them (the “hub”)-is open source. The good thing is, there are many choices to be found, with alternatives to run on everything from your always-on personal PC to a Raspberry Pi.

Below are a few of our favorites.

Calaos

Calaos is designed as a full-stack home automation platform, together with a server application, touchscreen display screen interface, web application, native mobile apps for android and ios, and a preconfigured Linux OS to run underneath. English speaking readers should be advised that, while some English documentation is accessible, a few of the instructional material together with support online forums are typically in French.

Calaos is licensed under version 3 of the GPL and you can view its source on GitHub. https://github.com/calaos

Domoticz

Domoticz is a home automation system with a rather wide selection of supported devices, covering anything from weather stations to smoke detectors to remote controls, with a great number of extra third party integrations documented on the project’s webpage. It is designed with an HTML5 frontend, which makes it available from both desktop browsers as well as most contemporary smartphones, and is light in weight, running on many low power items just like the Raspberry Pi.

Domoticz is written chiefly in C/C++ under the GPLv3, and its source code can be located on GitHub. https://github.com/domoticz/domoticz

Home Assistant

Home Assistant is an open source home automation platform, and is designed to be effortlessly deployed on just about any machine which can run Python 3, from a Raspberry Pi to a NAS device, and even ships with a Docker container to make deploying on other systems very easy. It brings together with a large number of open source and commercial products, which enables you to link, like, IFTTT, weather information, or maybe your Amazon Echo device, to controls from locks to lights to even a command line notifier.

Home Assistant is released under an MIT license, and its source is offred from GitHub. https://github.com/balloob/home-assistant

OpenHAB

OpenHAB (short for Open Home Automation Bus) is among the many best known home automation tools amongst open source lovers, with a considerable user community and quite a lot of supported devices and integrations. Written in Java, openHAB is light and portable across a large number of major OS’s and in addition runs nicely on the Raspberry Pi. Supporting 100s of devices, openHAB is designed to be device-agnostic while making it simpler for developers to include their own devices or plugins to the system. OpenHAB also ships android and ios applications for device control, together with a design tools to help you to produce your own User interface for your home system.

You can find openHAB’s source on GitHub licensed under the Eclipse Public License. https://github.com/openhab/openhab

OpenMotics

OpenMotics is a home automation system with both hardware and software under open source licenses, designed at providing an all-inclusive system for managing devices rather than sewing together a lot of devices from diverse providers. Unlike a lot of the other systems designed chiefly for simple retrofitting, OpenMotics is targeted on a hard wired solution. For additional information, see our full article from OpenMotics backend developer Frederick Ryckbosch.

The source for OpenMotics is licensed under the GPLv2 and is readily available for download on GitHub. https://github.com/openmotics

These are not the only options available, of course. A wide range of home automation fans decide on a diverse solution, or perhaps want to roll their own. Many other potential options to think about include things like LinuxMCE, PiDome, MisterHouse or smarthomatic. Other folks go for individual smart home devices without adding them into a single extensive system.

Embedded World 2015: Controllino is an Open Source PLC



Controllino is an open source programmable logic controller (PLC) built around Atmel’s ATmega328 and ATmega2560 microcontrollers (MCUs). Recently on …

source

5 Open Source Home Automation Solutions

The Internet of Things isn’t only a buzzword, it’s a rapidly expanding fact.

With an ever-rising variety of devices accessible to help you automate, protect, and monitor your house, it has never before been simpler nor more tempting to try your hand at home automation. Whether you’re seeking to manage your HVAC(Heating Ventilating Air Conditioning) system remotely, add in a home cinema, defend your home from theft, fire, or other risks, decrease your energy usage, or just control just a few lights, there are numerous devices on offer at your disposal.

While connected devices typically contain exclusive components, a good starting point in bringing open source into your home automation system is to be certain that the device which ties your devices together-and presents you with an interface to them (the “hub”)-is open source. Fortunately, there are many different solutions you can get, with options to run on everything from your always-on computer to a Raspberry Pi.

Read about a part of our favorites.

Calaos

Calaos is designed as a full-stack home automation platform, with a server application, touchscreen display screen interface, web application, native mobile apps for iOS and Android, and a preconfigured Linux operating platform to run underneath. English speaking readers should be advised that, while some English documentation can be obtained, a portion of the instructional material and even support forums are largely in French.

Calaos is licensed under version 3 of the GPL and you can view its source code on GitHub. https://github.com/calaos

Domoticz

Domoticz is a home automation system with a quite wide collection of supported devices, including weather stations to smoke detectors to remote controls, with a countless number of additional 3rd party integrations documented on the project’s site. It is designed with an HTML5 frontend, which makes it accessible from both desktop browsers as well as most modern cell phones, and is featherweight, running on countless low power systems similar to the Raspberry Pi.

Domoticz is written mostly in C/C++ under the GPLv3, and its source code can easily be located on GitHub. https://github.com/domoticz/domoticz

Home Assistant

Home Assistant is an open source home automation platform, and is designed to be conveniently deployed on almost any machine that could run Python 3, from a Raspberry Pi to a NAS system, and in addition ships with a Docker container to make deploying on other systems a snap. It brings together with lots of open source and also commercial offerings, letting you link, like, IFTTT, weather information, or maybe your Amazon Echo device, to handles from locks to lights to even a command line notifier.

Home Assistant is released under an MIT license, and its source code readily available for download from GitHub. https://github.com/balloob/home-assistant

OpenHAB

OpenHAB (represent Open Home Automation Bus) is one of the most widely known home automation tools among open source fans, with a sizeable user community and quite a lot of supported devices and integrations. Written in Java, openHAB is transportable across many major operating systems and in addition runs nicely on the Raspberry Pi. Supporting hundreds of devices, openHAB is designed to be device-agnostic while making it easier for developers to add their own devices or plugins to the system. OpenHAB also ships iOS and Android apps for device control, in addition to a design tools which enables you to develop your own User interface for your smart home system.

You can easily find openHAB’s source code on GitHub licensed under the Eclipse Public License. https://github.com/openhab/openhab

OpenMotics

OpenMotics is a smart home automation system with both hardware and software under open source licenses, designed at providing an extensive system for managing devices in place of stitching together many devices from various providers. Different from lots of the other systems designed mostly for easy retrofitting, OpenMotics focuses on a traditional hardwired solution. For much more, see our full article from OpenMotics backend developer Frederick Ryckbosch.

The source code for OpenMotics is licensed under the GPLv2 and is accessible for download on GitHub. https://github.com/openmotics

These aren’t the only available options, not surprisingly. A variety of home automation fans choose a various solution, or maybe even elect to roll their particular. Many other potential options to contemplate consist of LinuxMCE, PiDome, MisterHouse or smarthomatic. Other folks go for personal smart home devices without integrating them into a single all-inclusive system.

Building home gateways with Eclipse SmartHome



Slides are available on Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/xthirtynine/eclipse-smart-home-webinar

Despite the buzz around the Internet of Things (IoT) there are still many devices, systems and protocols for home automation that cannot be directly hooked up to your wifi and used through IP.

To enable smartphone apps to access them and to integrate them with other devices, an IP gateway is required – if it connects to more than just one specific system, this is usually called a home gateway.

Eclipse SmartHome is a flexible software framework for such home gateways. Being initiated by the popular open-source project openHAB, the Eclipse SmartHome project leads the way from the niche to the mass market by fostering industry adoption and by introducing new concepts for setup and configuration procedures of such solutions.

In this webinar you will learn about the concepts of Eclipse SmartHome, what services it provides and how to build a customized solution with it.

source

5 Open Home Automation Solutions

The Internet of Things is not merely a buzzword, it’s a fast expanding fact.

With an ever-rising variety of devices on the market to help you automate, protect, and monitor your property, it has never been simpler nor more tempting to try your hand at home automation. Whether you’re expecting to manage your HVAC(Heating Ventilating Air Conditioning) system from another location, add in a home entertainment, safeguard your home from stealing, fire, or other threats, reduce your energy use, or perhaps control a small number of lights, there are loads of devices offered at your grasp.

While connected devices oftentimes contain personal components, a good starting point in bringing open source into your home automation system is to ensure that the device which ties your devices together-and presents you with an interface to them (the “hub”)-is open source. The good news is, there are many different options in existence, with options to run on everything from your always-on computer to a Raspberry Pi.

Have a look at a portion of our preferred.

Calaos

Calaos is designed as a full-stack home automation platform, together with a server application, touchscreen interface, web application, native mobile phone applications for android and ios, and a preconfigured Linux operating system to run underneath. English speaking readers should be advised that, while some English documentation is accessible, a portion of the instructional material together with support community forums are primarily in French.

Calaos is licensed under version 3 of the GPL and you can view its source on GitHub. https://github.com/calaos

Domoticz

Domoticz is a home automation system with a very wide collection of supported devices, including weather stations to smoke detectors to remote controls, with a countless number of added third party integrations documented on the project’s site. It is designed with an HTML5 frontend, rendering it reachable from both desktop computer browsers as well as most modern cell phones, and is light-weight, running on various low power devices just like the Raspberry Pi.

Domoticz is written chiefly in C/C++ under the GPLv3, and its source code can be found on GitHub. https://github.com/domoticz/domoticz

Home Assistant

Home Assistant is an open source home automation platform, and is designed to be quickly deployed on essentially any machine which could run Python 3, from a Raspberry Pi to a NAS system, and even arrives with a Docker container to make deploying on other systems so easy. It combines with a great number of open source and also business oriented products, which means you can link, for example, IFTTT, weather information, or perhaps your Amazon Echo device, to handles from locks to lights to even a command line notifier.

Home Assistant is released under an MIT license, and its source is available from GitHub. https://github.com/balloob/home-assistant

OpenHAB

OpenHAB (short for Open Home Automation Bus) is among the most famous home automation tools among open source fanatics, with a large user community and a good number of supported devices and integrations. Written in Java, openHAB is transportable across most major systems and in addition runs effectively on the Raspberry Pi. Supporting many devices, openHAB is designed to be device-agnostic while making it easier for developers to add their own devices or plugins to the system. OpenHAB also ships android and ios apps for device control, and a design tools so you’re able to produce your own UI for your smart home system.

You’ll find openHAB’s source on GitHub licensed under the Eclipse Public License. https://github.com/openhab/openhab

OpenMotics

OpenMotics is a smart home automation system with both hardware and software under open source licenses, designed at providing an in depth system for managing devices rather than stitching together many devices from various providers. In contrast to several of the other systems designed chiefly for simple retrofitting, OpenMotics concentrates on a traditional hardwired solution. For much more, see our full article from OpenMotics backend developer Frederick Ryckbosch.

The source for OpenMotics is licensed under the GPLv2 and is readily available for download on GitHub. https://github.com/openmotics

These aren’t the only available choices, needless to say. Loads of home automation hobbyists opt for a various solution, or perhaps prefer to roll their very own. Several other potential choices to think of include things like LinuxMCE, PiDome, MisterHouse or smarthomatic. Other folks go for personal smart home devices without adding them into a single well-rounded system.